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BIRDING
 BY : LAWRENCE ALROYWhile birding in the Chobe region is wonderful all year round, it peaks from November to March when the humid Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone flashes and rumbles southwards from Zambia and unplugs its moisture-laden clouds over our area. The soaking rain spawns a cornucopia of new-born creeping, hopping, flying and swimming creatures that will replenish the diets of the migrant birds that follow.     The African paradise flycatcher, its cobalt blue... Read On
Posted In: Chobe
 Byline :            Lawrence AlroyPhotographer:  Phil ZappalaCaption  : Marital eagle in actionIn September, while the mercury rises and the bush is still dry and dusty, there is plenty to keep the birder interested around Chobe – if you can pull yourself away from your deck chair in the shade.Spring marks the return en masse of the colourful carmine bee-eaters and the ever-aerobatic yellow-billed kites, and is also a good time... Read On
Posted In: Chobe
 By : Lawrence AlroyMust-see Chobe birds – look out for these!African finfootWestern banded snake eagleOspreyDespite cold mornings and evenings, there is much enjoyable winter birding in Chobe. Don’t miss those species that love sunning themselves on uppermost branches at dawn - you will be surprised at the variety. Later, when the winter easterly breeze has lessened, thermals are usually well-populated with marabou storks as well as a selection of raptors - the bateleur being my... Read On
Posted In: Chobe
RORY McDOUGALLZambia is a country rich in miombo forest, mixed woodland and wetland, with a bird check-list of 753 species, a truly exciting birding destination. Four resident birds definitely should be seen.The endemic Chaplin’s or Zambian barbet (Lybius chaplini), found in groups of two to six in central and southern Zambia, lives in sycamore fig trees, feeding on figs and nesting in dead branches. Breeding runs from August to November, with family groups perching on exposed treetops snapping... Read On
Posted In: Livingstone
PETER MUNDYMost of our vultures have a wing span of two metres and more, even up to three metres. And with body weights of between 2kg and 10kg,they are formidable birds. Vultures soaring in a thermal,and gathering in dozens, even hundreds, at a carcass in the bush,are formidable sights. This is how we know them in the savannas of Africa. There cannot be a single game ranger or tourist guidewho is not familiar with the birds,and hopefully knowledgeable about them too. Body:The most common... Read On
Posted In: Home
ALAN SPARROWThe five countries of the Kavango Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area (KAZA TFCA) have many great birding spots. So many, that for this article we have focused on the area where the four countries of Namibia, Zambia, Botswana and Zimbabwe meet on the Zambezi River, sometimes known as “The Four Corners”. If you were to plan a birding safari to the Four Corners, where would you go? What birds would you see? Are there any ‘specials’?Look at the map below. You see that this area has... Read On
Posted In: Chobe
PETER STEYNIn October the Zambezi falls to its lowest level, exposing sandbanks and the rocks in the rapids. It is a season of expectation, when the intense heat presages the coming of the rainy season, but meanwhile it is a time of crackling devil winds spiralling dry leaves high into a shimmering sky.The heat drains all one’s energy, but tophotograph what I termed my ‘Zambezi Trio’, this was the best time. The three species concerned were the white-crowned lapwing, rock pratincole and African... Read On
Posted In: Victoria Falls
Well-known author and ornithologist Peter Steyn’s natural history interests began with butterflies and snakes while still at preparatory school in Cape Town. At the age of 13 he took his first bird photograph and hasn’t stopped for 60 years, during which time his pictures and writings have appeared in some 350 publications world-wide.After graduating with a BA degree in English and History at the University of Cape Town in 1959, Peter emigrated with his wife and small son to what was then... Read On
Posted In: Victoria Falls
CHARLES BRIGHTMANAfter you have had a pampering massage in the new spa facility at Imbabala Safari Lodge overlooking the Zambezi, you can get out there and start looking for those special ‘lifers’ that are particular to this destination. The location isa prime spot where flood plain and riverine specials occur, the northwest tip of Zimbabwe right on the borders of Botswana and Zambia.Besides a good pair of binoculars and field guides, it is helpful to have a tablet with an app that has the bird... Read On
Posted In: Victoria Falls
CLARE MATEKEThe team of observers during this season’s water bird counts along the Zambezi River enjoyed good sightings of both common and a few rare species this January. The biannual water bird count is carried out by the Livingstone Museum in conjunction with the Zambia Wildlife Authority and local volunteers. Over five days, covering five different stretches of water, a total of 1,076 birds of 42 species were counted.Just upriver from the Royal Livingstone Hotel a number of rock pratincole... Read On
Posted In: Livingstone
DAMIAN NEWMARCHBird atlassing is simply birding a set area using a defined protocol to produce a list of records which are then submitted. There are two sides to atlassing - the birding part where you are outdoors compiling your list - and the more scientific side of it, which many atlassers don't delve into after submitting their lists.Quite simply it is birding with a purpose. To be valuable it needs to be repeated, which brings a temporal component to the data. The term ‘atlassing’ is used... Read On
‘Birding with a purpose.’This was my mantra when planning a weekend trip to Kariba to celebrate my son’s 16th birthday. I was enticed after reading Damian Newmarch’s article on bird atlassing. I briefed my children (this was to be a family affair) and Steve Edwards, our guide, patiently helped us identify the birds. On our first day we headed out on an afternoon cruise, with binoculars, notebook and the will to see as many birds as possible.It really was good fun and as we noted down each bird... Read On