Botswana

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Largest protected conservation zone in the world!

Largest protected conservation zone in the world!

Largest protected conservation zone in the world!
Largest protected conservation zone in the world!

 

The signing of the Kavango-Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area (KAZA TFCA) Treaty on 18  August 2011 in Luanda, Angola during the closing ceremony of the SADC Summit by the KAZA Heads of State, and the opening of the KAZA Secretariat office on 26 August 2011, effectively formalizes and legalizes the establishment of a giant conservation zone in the Okavango and Zambezi River basins.  This conservation zone is the largest protected tourism area in the world. It is over half the size of France. These two events are important milestones in the establishment of the KAZA TFCA and have laid the foundation for taking its development to the next level and towards realizing the KAZA vision and the objectives outlined in the Treaty.

In December 2008 the ministers responsible for environment, wildlife, tourism and natural resources agreed to locate the head quarters of KAZA TFCA in Kasane, Botswana as Kasane is considered the heart of this conservation landscape where the borders of four of the five partner countries converge these being Botswana, Namibia, Zambia and Zimbabwe.  Honourable O K Mokaila, Minister of Environment, Wildlife and Tourism (Botswana) together with visiting Minister Dirk Niebel of the Federal Ministry of Economic Co-operation and Development of the Republic of Germany officially opened the KAZA secretariat office in the presence of the other KAZA partner countries.

The region is known for rare species including cheetah, african wild dog, black sable and rhino. It is also home to some 250,000 elephant.

Honourable Minister of Economic Development and Co-operation of the Republic of Germany, Hon. Dirk Niebel commented: “This operation illustrates in a nutshell what, in my opinion, characterises successful international co-operation for sustainable development. North and South Germany, Switzerland and the Netherlands together with SADC, are jointly supporting this transfrontier nature park. So far we have provided 20 million Euros for the development of infrastructure in the KAZA region.” He also said that “Even more important, however, is that, in the future, the animals will no longer have to stop at borders created by humans as they go on their migrations.”

He is convinced that the inauguration of the new KAZA Secretariat is a milestone for regional co-operation in the SADC region.

Read more on the KAZA TFCA:
KAZA TFCA

Read more from this issue:
Zambezi Traveller (Issue 06, Sept 2011)

Read more about the region in our destination guide:
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